→ 5.60 → Santander → 3.50km → Peñacastillo

Altitude
15
To end of camino
560.90
ATM
Yes
Bar
Yes
Bus
Yes
Bus Terminal
Yes
Correos
Yes
Grocery
Yes
Hospital
Yes
Medical Center
Yes
Pharmacy
Yes
Train
Yes

The ferry from Somo disembarks rather conveniently at the café lined Paseo de Pereda, and from this point you need to decide which direction to head; if you had been wondering where you could spend a rest day this is the place.

To your left is the Nuestra Señora de la Asunción Cathedral, built over the location of the previous Abbey of the Holy Bodies whose charge was to hold safe the relics of Emeterio and Celedonio (see history below).

Once you are done with the Cathedral, cross the park and walk tall through the massive arch in the Banco Santander building then turn left, the next building on your right is the small Mercado del Este, a convenient place for a casual lunch and the tourist information office. If you expect more from a market, head to the Mercado de La Esperanza (what better name than The Market of Hope).

Getting to the city’s most emblematic building, the Palacio de la Magdalena, requires a decent walk to the far east of the peninsula. There is a modest fee but the timetable is limited to tours starting on the hour. The Palace was funded by the citizens and used as a Summer residence by King Alfonso XIII until he was removed from power after the formation of the Second Republic in 1931.

 

Fiesta

San Juan is celebrated, and bonfires are lit, on the 24th of June.
Santiago is celebrated on the 25th of July. San Emeterio and San Celedonio, patrons of Santander, are celebrated on the 29th of August.
The Fiestas de la Virgen de la Bien Aparecida are held on the 15th of September

 

History

So fantastic are the stories surrounding the 8th century founding of the city of Santander that most people pay little notice that it was the Romans that first called this place Portus Victoriae. Their hard work was eclipsed by the arrival by boat of the mortal remains of two of their most famously martyred soldiers, San Emeterio and San Celedonio. Their relics were sent here to be kept safe from the Muslims during the 9th century. Between the brothers, it was Emeterio whose name would be memorialized when Santander, a derivation of the vulgar Latin Sant Emeter, was chosen.

The Road

Between Santander and Boo de Piélagos there are two routes, the official camino and the Senda Litoral (coastal trail) that follows the coastline north of the city.

The Senda Litoral starts at the ferry terminal and continues along the coast, with the water on your right, all the way around the city. The option is a great deal more scenic than the official camino and it is growing in popularity among pilgrims. At 33km it is the longer option. The official camino turns left at the ferry dock and across the adjacent city park. The path through town is clear and city walking from here to the far end of Santander. At the edge of the park turn left and follow this road; it is the Paseo de Pereda when you begin but changes names along the way. Officially it is the N-611. After passing the large university hospital complex on your left the camino goes through two large roundabouts. At the second roundabout follow the signs in the direction of the Avenida de Cajo, which will take you to the start of Peñacastillo.

Comments

Camino de Sant… (not verified)

Hi, I walked the coastal route today Oct 5,2022 and I do NOT recommend it! Yes some good views but also quite some walking between holiday houses! So for me not so spectacular as it is made out here. Red signed route is at times not or no longer correct! I kept losing the way. After about 2/3 of the way I left and went on to the main road to Boo. Not worth all the trouble and 31km for a few nice views (coast before Santander was more spectacular).

Camino de Sant… (not verified)

I can recommend this hotel: it’s pretty much on the inland route out of town, has a good bar that serves all day and huge showers. Rooms are simple but very clean, and the staff are lovely. There’s a good cheap laundrette very close, too, and several other reasonably priced bars and restaurants. No a/c but the rooms have fans. blueK

Camino de Sant… (not verified)

There is a way to shorten that for those who want to do the coast but are a bit afraid of 33km. You can navigate on Google maps straight through santander North (for example, to Playa La Maruca, or to the Faro, or I went to a little monument called Panteón del inglés) and depends on which point you pick, you can shave off up to 5-6km.
I saw a bunch of spectacular things after Playa La Maruca. Would recommend the coastal way mostly though for people who are well on their feet and have decent balance, it was a little scrambly at some points.

Camino de Sant… (not verified)

I walked the coastal route from Santander to Boo today and while it took a long time (7.5 hours, about 33km) it was very beautiful. The easiest thing to do is stick to the coastal path as there are literally no signs or markings. Stunning views onto Isla Castro too. Strongly recommend it.

michael

Both albergues closed (one just refused to open because he would need to find a cleaner). Stayed in the train station hostel where they threw away my walking stick. It's no wonder that the bank named itself after this discomforting city.

michael

Little is any signs and difficult to follow in places. However, worth the effort for spectacular views. If 33km feels too much just Route find directly towards the coast out of Santander- cuts it to circa 25km.

michael

Having walked both the coastal and the official (don’t ask) I cannot emphasize enough how spectacular the coastal is. Organize your trip around taking the time to do this. For me
It was give or take the most beautiful section so far.

michael

We walked the red costal route and if you follow the app it was the highlight day so far . there’s plenty of bars at the beaches after about 15k . scenery was breathtaking. Great lighthouse. We walked in mid June

michael

We walked the coastal route in August 2018 and loved it. You walk around the headlands going past some stunning beaches and rock formations. It is a longer way but we spent the night in Boo de Pielagos which was a really good albergue. This way is really recommended.

michael

The coasts route is really difficult to find in places. Take it with caution! There’s poison oak along parts that look like the trail. Only do this by following the directions exactly. Between a sprained ankle, poison oak, and mud soaked shoes, we had to take a cab to Boo after 15 km.