Camino Primitivo in A Coruña | Wise Pilgrim Guide to the Camino de Santiago

Irago de Arriba

5.70km
Altitude: 
448

Welcoming, if somewhat curious, bar.

This is the last stop on the Camino Primitivo before it joins the Camino Frances in Melide. The number of pilgrims will increase noticeably. So too will your options for accommodation and morning coffee.

Melide

Distance to Santiago: 
52.70
5.80km
Altitude: 
456

Although it has been on the menu as far back as O Cebreiro, Pulpo (octopus) doesn’t seem to garnish much attention until Melide. Despite its apparent disconnect with the sea, Melide’s thriving Thursday market meant that shipping pulpo was a profitable enterprise. It is served today as it was then: on a wooden plate, garnished only with a healthy drizzle of olive oil and a shake of paprika. It is eaten with a rather crude looking toothpick, alongside heavy Galician bread and a bowl of the local Ribeiro wine.

One of the better places to try it is Pulpería a Garnacha, the last door on your left before you get to the main road in Melide.

Melide, long the crossroads between territories, is also the meeting point of the various camino routes which come from the north, including the part of the Camino del Norte and the Camino Primitivo. Because of this, and the proximity to Santiago, the road become a great deal more congested.

The melindre is another of Melide’s favorite foods. It resembles a glazed donut and is sold from dozens of identical booths during festivals.

The Road: 

The traffic through Melide can be dangerous, particularly on market days. The arrows through town can be difficult to spot. Simply follow along with the main road to the first roundabout. If you have not yet crossed the main road do so at the roundabout, and then cross the road that runs perpendicular to it. Arrows should point you towards a small side street through the old part of town that parallels the main road.

There are many other yellow arrows that direct you towards the many albergues in town, they are often attached to adverts or are painted alongside a simple ‘A’. These can be ignored.

History: 

Melide is an ancient settlement and despite its importance as a natural crossroad since Neolithic times, it has never been protected by a wall. In Medieval times the overwhelming bulk of the town industries were tied to the camino. This is evident today in the way the town is shaped; stretched out lengthwise along the camino road.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Melide
San Antonio, 25

Xunta
156 6
2 Albergue O Apalpador
San Antonio, 23

Private
30 10 Photo in Albergue O Apalpador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue O Apalpador on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Pereiro
Progreso, 43

Private
40 6/10
4 Albergue O Cruceiro
Ronda de A Coruña, 2

Private
72 10 Photo in Albergue O Cruceiro on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Melide
Lugo, 92

Private
57 10 Photo in Albergue Melide on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue O Apalpador II
Cantón de San Roque, 9

Private
32 10 Photo in Albergue O Apalpador II on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue O Apalpador II on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Vilela
San Antonio, 2

Private
28 10 Photo in Albergue Vilela on the Camino de Santiago
8 Albergue San Anton
San Antonio, 6

Private
36 10 Photo in Albergue San Anton on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue San Anton on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pensión Xaneiro
La Habana, 43

Pension
Photo in Pensión Xaneiro on the Camino de Santiago
10 Pensión Berenguela
San Roque, 2

Pension
11 Hotel Pousada Chiquitín
San Antón, 18

Hotel
16 30-70 Photo in Hotel Pousada Chiquitín on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Hotel Pousada Chiquitín on the Camino de Santiago
12 Pensión El Molino
Castro, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión El Molino on the Camino de Santiago
13 B&B A Lúa do Camiño
Circunvalación - Campo da Feira

Casa Rural
Photo in B&B A Lúa do Camiño on the Camino de Santiago
14 Hotel Carlos 96
Lugo, 119

Hotel
15 Hotel Sony
Santiago

Hotel
16 Albergue Alfonso II
Toques y Friol, 52-54

Private
34 10 Photo in Albergue Alfonso II on the Camino de Santiago
17 Albergue Arraigos
Cantón San Roque, 9

Private
20 10
18 Albergue Montoto
Codeseira, 31

Private
42 10

Raído

Distance to Santiago: 
49.40
Altitude: 
453

A Peroxa

Distance to Santiago: 
47.20
Altitude: 
415

Boente

Distance to Santiago: 
46.90
2.80km
Altitude: 
392

The first building in Boente on your left is the Bar de los Alemanes, and this is the best bar in town. Further down the hill, the camino crosses the main road (caution) where two albergues and a few bars are located.

You can get a sello in the Iglesia de Santiago de Boente, and curiously enough the entrance that most pilgrims use leads directly to the sacristy. A collection of hundreds of prayer cards from around the world adorn the walls, and if the priest is not there to stamp your credencial he leaves it out for you to take matters into your own hands.

The Road: 

Walking past the church the camino turns right and descends more. The hills ahead are steep in both directions, take it easy.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Os Albergues

Private
30 11 Photo in Albergue Os Albergues on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Boente
En frente de la Iglesia

Private
22 10

Castañeda

Distance to Santiago: 
44.10
2.50km
Altitude: 
382
The Road: 

It is uphill once more, followed by a steady descent into the valley below, steep at points.

History: 

It is said that the ovens that produced lime for the construction of the Cathedral were here in Castañeda. Pilgrims carried the raw materials here from Triacastela and swapped it for lime which they carried to Santiago.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Santiago

Private
6 1 Photo in Albergue Santiago on the Camino de Santiago

Ribadiso da Baixo

Distance to Santiago: 
41.60
0.80km
Altitude: 
305

A bar near the river with a large patio for celebrating a successful walk. The river here is quite cold and the perfect place to dip your feet.

The Road: 

The camino to Arzúa begins with a steady walk uphill. By the time you reach the road it levels out and the remaining kilometers are flat into town.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Ribadiso da Baixo
Ribadiso de Baixo

Municipal
70 6 Photo in Albergue de Ribadiso da Baixo on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Los Caminantes
Ribadiso de Baixo

Private
56 10 Photo in Albergue Los Caminantes on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Los Caminantes on the Camino de Santiago

Arzúa

Distance to Santiago: 
38.50
2.30km
Altitude: 
386

Arzúa is a pleasant town with almost enough beds for pilgrims. If you find everything to be full and don’t feel like splurging on one of the many hotels in the area, the Polideportivo (sports hall) is often used to house pilgrims.

Between here and O Pedrouzo lie a string of very small Galician hamlets of little note. The locals in these parts enjoy telling you, without the slightest tone of irony or sarcasm, that ‘no hay vacas in Galicia’ (there are no cows in Galicia). Hold that thought in your head while you slosh through a soggy trail on an otherwise sunny day.

Fiesta: 

Famous for its cheese, Arzúa hosts an annual (and three day long) Festival of Cheese in March. They have been doing so for 40 years.

The Road: 

The camino leaves Arzúa along a footpath, NOT the road. If you arrived at the main square, walk past the church (with your back to the road) and turn right onto the side street. The terrain is pleasant, a blend of trails and paved roads through small towns and lots of forests. There are a few steep sections but none of any considerable length.

History: 

Connecting Arzúa to the Camino de Santiago during Medieval times is an imperfect science. There is no mention of a town with that name, only one in the area called Villanova. Scholars widely agree that the absence of any other Villanova in the area, and the presence of two Romanesque churches in Arzúa, are clues enough that they are one and the same.

If so, Arzúa has the unfortunate distinction of being the town with a poor reputation for hospitality towards pilgrims. A story tells of a hungry pilgrim who begged a local woman for a piece of the bread she was baking. She refused, and he cursed the loaf; turning it to stone.

Tetilla Cheese: You might have seen this curiously shaped cheese in the shop windows. If you made a connection between the name and the shape you are not mistaken. It was shaped this way by cheese makers in protest to the bishop of Santiago. At the time the Portico de la Gloria (Master Mateo’s famous sculptures at the Cathedrals main entrance) was being finished and the bishop took issue with the odd smile on the prophet Daniels’ face. The clever bishop followed his gaze across the doorway and found that Queen Esther’s bosom was augmented by a cheeky sculptor. Daniel kept his smile, Esther had a reduction, and we got boob-shaped-protest-cheese.

Photo in Arzúa on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Arzúa
Cima de Lugar, 6

Xunta
46 6 Photo in Albergue de Arzúa on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Ultreia
Lugo, 126

Private
38 10* Photo in Albergue Ultreia on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Via Lactea
José Antonio, 26

Private
120 10/12 Photo in Albergue Via Lactea on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Via Lactea on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Don Quijote
Lugo, 130

Private
50 10 Photo in Albergue Don Quijote on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue da Fonte
Carme, 18

Private
20 10/12 Photo in Albergue da Fonte on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue Santiago Apóstol (Arzúa)
Lugo, 107

Private
72 10/12
7 Albergue Los Caminantes
Santiago, 14

Private
28 10
8 De Camino Albergue
Lugo, 118

Private
46 10 Photo in De Camino Albergue on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in De Camino Albergue on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pazo Santa María
O Pazo

Hotel
Photo in Pazo Santa María on the Camino de Santiago
10 Hotel Suiza
Vello

Hotel
11 Pensión Mesón do Peregrino
Ramón Franco, 7

Pension
12 Pensión Rúa
Lugo, 130

Pension
13 Pensión Casa Teodora
Lugo, 38

Pension
14 O Albergue de Selmo
Lugo, 133

Private
50 10
15 La Casona de Nené
Padre Pardo, 24

Hotel
16 Pensión Cima do Lugar
Cima do Lugar, 22

Pension

A Peroxa

Distance to Santiago: 
35.20
Altitude: 
388

Calle - O Outeiro

Distance to Santiago: 
30.80
1.40km
Altitude: 
346

Calle is a town forsaken by modernization. Apart from a pair of bars, it does not appear that much has changed in recent centuries. The camino twists and turns through it, crossing a small creek next to a large wash basin.

Salceda

Distance to Santiago: 
27.60
2.60km
Altitude: 
367

There are a pair of bars in Salceda, and a restaurant (La Esquipa) that is thick with pilgrims every day but Monday when it is closed.

Notice: 

The camino rejoins the road in Salceda, and while it does not walk on the road it does remain quite close. In fact, the camino crosses the road several times between here and Santiago. The speed of traffic, the curves in the road, and the abundance of pilgrims makes this the most dangerous stretch along the camino. Cross carefully and quickly and always under the road when possible.

The Road: 

The camino leaves town to the right of a wedge shaped park next to La Esquipa, not along the road.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue Touristico de Salceda
Calzada

Private
8 in albergue 28 in pension 10/12 Photo in Albergue Touristico de Salceda on the Camino de Santiago
2 El Albergue de Boni
N-547, km 75.5

Private
30 10
3 Albergue Alborada
N-547

Private
10 12

Empalme

Distance to Santiago: 
23.40
1.00km
Altitude: 
407

Several roadside bars that cater to trucker and pilgrim alike.

Notice: 

CAUTION crossing the road, dangerous intersection.

The Road: 

The camino crosses the main road at the highest point in the road, there is no marked crosswalk and the arrows on the other side of the road are often obscured by parked cars. You may see pilgrims continuing along the road but are advised against following them as the camino returns to the trail when you turn off the road.

Half way down the hill it splits and arrows indicate that you should either turn left to go under the road or continue straight. Unless you have reason to visit Santa Irene you can keep on straight and avoid the hassle of crossing back over the road. If you continue straight you will arrive at the important part of Santa Irene (the part with the bar).

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Andaina

Private
14 10

A Rúa [O Pino]

Distance to Santiago: 
21.00
1.60km
Altitude: 
279
The Road: 

Where the camino returns to the road at the start of O Pedrouzo you will find an abundance of arrows and a large map which is nearly worthless. Arrows and dozens of signs advertising various hostels and hotels point in every direction. If you have a reservation, review the map to find the best path, otherwise turn left up the road. If you are not staying the night in Pedrouzo, cross the road here and continue along the camino.

◁ into Pedrouzo or △ along camino

260

After passing through A Rua the camino meets up with the N-547.

Turn left here if you intend to stay in Pedrouzo or use any of it's services. From the center of town the camino will turn right to eventually rejoin the track that continues straight across the road towards a sports complex and at least one bar.

O Pedrouzo [Arca do Pino]

Distance to Santiago: 
19.40
0.70km
Altitude: 
282

Unfortunately, there is little to say about this modernized town. When it comes to charm, or monuments, or outrageous legends, it comes up short. During the busier periods along the camino the town feels overrun with pilgrims; most of whom are excited to have finished their penultimate day of walking.

Notice: 

Avoid the temptation of following the main road out of Pedrouzo. There are very few arrows to get you back to the camino and following along the road puts you in very real danger and takes you away from a lovely forest walk. See note below to get back to the camino.

The Road: 

If you spent the night in Arca, it is important to find your way back to the camino proper which runs through the forest to the north. To get to it, find the intersection of the main road and Calle de Condello (where the Casa do Concello is located). Continue uphill (north from here) and in a few hundred meters the camino presents itself. Turn left and continue through the forest to Amenal.

The camino between here and Santiago is a mixture of rural and urban settings, some forests and some sprawl. The up and downs that you have been experiencing continue: the elevation gain/loss is +308/-339m, a not insignificant amount.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Arca do Pino
Pedrouzo

Xunta
120 6 Photo in Albergue de Arca do Pino on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Porta de Santiago
Lugo, 11

Private
60 10 Photo in Albergue Porta de Santiago on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue O Burgo
Lugo, 47

Private
14 10 Photo in Albergue O Burgo on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Edreira
Fonte, 19

Private
40 10 Photo in Albergue Edreira on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Edreira on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Otero
Forcarei, 2

Private
36 10 Photo in Albergue Otero on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Otero on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo
Iglesia, 7

Private
94 10 Photo in Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue REM
Iglesia, 7

Private
40 10 Photo in Albergue REM on the Camino de Santiago
8 Hotel O Pino
A Rúa, 9

Hotel
Photo in Hotel O Pino on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pensión Una Estrella Dorada
Lugo, 10

Pension
Photo in Pensión Una Estrella Dorada on the Camino de Santiago
10 Pensión Maribel
Mollados, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión Maribel on the Camino de Santiago
11 Pensión A Solaina
Picón, 3

Pension
Photo in Pensión A Solaina on the Camino de Santiago
12 Pensión Platas
Lugo, 26

Pension
13 Pensión 9 de Abril
Santiago, 7

Pension
Photo in Pensión 9 de Abril on the Camino de Santiago
14 Pensión En Ruta SCQ
Santiago, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión En Ruta SCQ on the Camino de Santiago
15 Pensión Arca
Mollados, 25

Pension
16 Pensión Compás
Lugo, 47

Pension
17 Albergue O Trisquel
Picón, 1

Private
68 10
18 Pensión Codesal
Codesal, 17

Pension
19 Pensión Maruja
Nova, 9

Pension
20 Pensión O Muiño
Muiño, 1

Pension
21 Bule Bic
Lugo, 18

Pension
22 Pensión Casal de Calma
Igrexa, 10

Pension
23 LO Pedrouzo
Mollados, 43

Pension

Amenal

Distance to Santiago: 
16.40
4.00km
Altitude: 
250

Amenal is little more than a camino pit-stop, and the large outdoor patio of the only bar is often filled to capacity with pilgrims doing their best to make the last day last.

Notice: 

The camino crosses the very busy N-547 by passing underneath it. Do not cross over the road.

The Road: 

Leaving the bar behind you climb steeply uphill a short distance. The path soon levels out on a comfortable trail surrounded by eucalyptus trees. The Santiago Airport is very near, and the camino follows a path around the runway.

Name booking.com
1 Hotel Amenal
Amenal, 12

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Amenal on the Camino de Santiago

Cimadevila

Distance to Santiago: 
16.00
Altitude: 
283

San Paio - San Payo

Distance to Santiago: 
12.40
2.10km
Altitude: 
334
History: 

The written history of San Paio has been lost to the ages, but the church here is dedicated to San Paio (or Payo), the 14 year old saint who was kidnapped by the invading Muslim troops, taken to Sevilla, and ultimately martyred to pieces and tossed into the Guadalquivir.

Lavacolla

Distance to Santiago: 
10.30
1.30km
Altitude: 
293
The Road: 

If you walked down the stairs to visit either of the bars at the bottom, turn and walk up the steps towards the Iglesia de Benaval. The camino continues around to the right-hand side and down to cross the road. At the road, cross at the crosswalk and continue along the road and over the famous river (see inset below).

The last hill is ahead, and if you are a stickler for doing things according to tradition you should start running now. It is said that the first of your group to arrive in Monte de Gozo is entitled to be called King. Be advised that there is no prize.

History: 

The name Lavacolla has one of the most debated origins of all the camino towns. They range from the bland “field at the bottom of the hill” to the more profane “scrub your scrotum.” What is more widely accepted is that pilgrims bathed in this river before entering the Cathedral.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Hotel Ruta Jacobea
Lavacolla, 41

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Ruta Jacobea on the Camino de Santiago
2 Hotel Garcas
Naval, 2

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Garcas on the Camino de Santiago
3 Hostal San Paio
Lavacolla

Hostal
4 Pazo Xan Xordo
Xan Xordo, 6

Casa Rural
Photo in Pazo Xan Xordo on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Lavacolla
Lavacolla, 35

Private
32 12

Monte del Gozo

Distance to Santiago: 
5.00
5.00km
Altitude: 
338

Monte de Gozo, or Mount Joy, was once the first place that pilgrims could get a glimpse of the Cathedral spires. A new stand of trees blocks the view now. It is a large gathering place for pilgrims, who flock to the over-sized monument commemorating the pilgrimage that Pope John Paul II made here in 1993. The modest Capilla de San Marcos has the last stamp and a small kiosk selling cold drinks.

The Road: 

You do not need to enter the complex but for the sake of curiosity, carrying on down the road will take you where you are heading.

Pass the outdoor gallery of a local (and gifted) sculptor of stone and cross the bridge over the highway. It is midway over this bridge that you enter the city of Santiago de Compostela but to keep pilgrims from crossing the road half way across the bridge, the sign indicating such has been moved further into the city.

Photo in Monte del Gozo on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Monte do Gozo
Estrellas, 80

Xunta
400 6

Santiago de Compostela

1.40km
Altitude: 
250

There is a tremendous amount of things to see and things to do in Santiago de Compostela; you are encouraged to stay for at least one full day extra for exploring the web of streets, all of which seem to bring you back to the Cathedral.

The pilgrim’s office and two tourist information offices (one for Santiago, one for Galicia) are located on the Rúa do Vilar. They can provide you will all of the information and maps you could need.

One word of caution regarding accommodation is in order. If you are arriving in the high season, you are advised to make a reservation in advance. There have been several additions to the albergue roster in recent year but the numbers of pilgrims still exceed capacity in the high season.

The Cathedral is the single largest attraction to Santiago and for good reason. Both inside and out it presents countless treasures to investigate, too many to list in fact but below are the best

The Cathedral - Plaza by plaza
1. Azabache: As you enter the city, the first part of the Cathedral that you pass is the Puerta de la Azabachería. This is the entrance that faces the Monastery of San Martin Piñario.

2: Obradoiro: From Azabache you pass under the Palace of the Bishop which is adjoined to the Cathedral and cannot possibly be the sort of palace that affords much peaceful sleeping; the sound of bagpipes welcoming you can be heard from dawn to dusk. The stairway leads directly to the Plaza de Obradoiro and kilometer zero for pilgrims. In the center of the plaza is the last scallop shell and you are likely to find pilgrims taking their shoes off for a photo with it, and the Obradoiro Facade behind them.

This facade is the most majestic and most photographed of the Cathedral and was part of the 18th century building projects that took place in Santiago. The baroque design will keep your eyes moving and the massive amounts of glass allow for the illumination of the Pórtico de la Gloria that lies behind it. That Pórtico was the original front to the church designed by Maestro Mateo 600 years before the new facade.

If you continue around the Cathedral you arrive at the Puerta de las Platerías (named for the silver craft that still exists in the shops below it). You will notice that some of the stonework stands out as a different material. These are replacement carvings, the originals were damaged and subsequently moved to the Cathedral Museum; and unfortunately for us the original composition was forgotten, leaving a somewhat nonsensical layout. In front of the doors are a set of stairs and the Platerías fountain.

Continuing around the Cathedral we arrive in the large Plaza de Quintana and the Puerta de Perdon. The actual Holy Door is behind this facade (which is not actually a structural part of the Cathedral, it is more like a highly decorated wall around the Holy Door itself). The carvings here are impressive and depict 24 Saints and prophets.

In medieval times it was common for pilgrims to spend the night in the Cathedral, sleeping on the stone floors and fighting (to the death on a few occasions) for the privilege of sleeping close to their chapel of choice.

The best time to visit is early in the morning before the crowds arrive, when paying a visit to the crypt and hugging the bust of Santiago can be done quietly and with a bit of contemplation.

The botafumeiro, quite possibly the largest thurible in the Catholic Church, is swung across the transept (from north to south) by a group of men called the tiraboleiros. It has only come loose from the ropes twice, and never in modern times. The 2017 schedule was unclear at the time this book was printed, ask at the pigrims office for more information.

The Monastery and Museum of San Martin Piñario
The enormity of this Monastery is difficult to comprehend, but if you pay close attention to this building as you walk around Santiago you will find that you are almost always standing next to it if you are on the north side of the Cathedral. There are three cloisters! The facade of the church often feels like it is somewhere else entirely and is quite curious for the fact that you must descend the staircase to get to the doors, rather than the other way around. The reason for this was a decree by the Archbishop that no building should exceed in elevation that of the Cathedral; the architects did not compromise by redesigning San Martin to be less tall, they simply dug down and started at a lower point.

San Fiz de Solovio
Compared to the two churches above, San Fiz feels like an almost minuscule affair. To find it, make your way to the Santiago Market. San Pelayo (the hermit that rediscovered the bones of Santiago) was praying here when the lights called him. Grand and majestic it is not, but the oldest building site in Santiago it certainly is. The church that exists today is not the original, but excavations have revealed the foundations and necropolis dating to the 6th century.

The Supply Market (Mercado de Abastos)
The produce market is a great place to wander for lunch. Compared to other markets in Spain (like those in Madrid and Barcelona) the Santiago market is a fairly solemn affair. In fact, the architecture appears almost strictly utilitarian and is as Galician as it gets. The vendors make the experience, and even if your Spanish is not up to par, it is worth the visit for a glimpse into the way the locals go about their most ordinary business.

The buildings you see today date from the early 1940’s but replace ones that stood for 300 years. In fact, many of the vendors are second, third, or fifth generation market operators.

Alameda Park
Alameda Park was once the sort of place where the people of Santiago would turn out for elaborate displays of personal wealth and stature; the various paths that cut through and around the park were only to be used by members of a certain class. Nowadays it is far more democratic. The park is the site of a Ferris wheel and feria during the Summer months, an ice skating rink during the Winter holidays, and a massive eucalyptus tree overlooking the Cathedral year round.

Casa De La Troya
The Troya House is the inspiration for and setting of one of the most celebrated novels in Spanish literature; in which a young man from Madrid if forced by his father to finish his Law studies in Santiago... a tale of misery and eventually love. It was once a boarding house for students and the museum that exists there today is an exhibit of what the house would have looked like at the time the novel was written. The Tuna, those wonderful musicians that perform in the Plaza Obradoiro every night, would have lived and performed here as well.

The Hidden Pilgrim

Hiding in the shadows cast by the Cathedral, in the Plaza Quintana, is the hidden pilgrim. He is only visible at night and might take a while to discover.

And lastly, there are many Monasteries, and while it would be a challenge to visit all of them it is important to realize their construction shaped the city that we see today. Taking the time to walk between them will reveal countless little treasures.

Fiesta: 

The Feast day of Saint James is celebrated with a full week of music and dance, with a fireworks display in the Plaza Obradoiro on the evening of the 24th of July. The best views can be had from Obradoiro, or from Alameda park.

Photo in Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela
Estocolmo, 2

Private
60 10/12 Photo in Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
2 Residencia de Peregrinos San Lázaro
San Lázaro

Xunta
80 10
3 Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela
Quiroga Palacios

Private
199 10/12 Photo in Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue O Fogar de Teodomiro
Algalia de Arriba, 3

Private
20 15 Photo in Albergue O Fogar de Teodomiro on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue de peregrinos Jaime García Rodríguez
Estocolmo

Association
150 8
6 Albergue Mundoalbergue
San Clemente, 26

Private
30 12/18 Photo in Albergue Mundoalbergue on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Mundoalbergue on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Santo Santiago
Valiño, 3

Private
40 10
8 Albergue Turístico La Salle
Tras Santa Clara

Private
84 17
9 Albergue Fin del Camino
Moscova

Parochial
110 8* Photo in Albergue Fin del Camino on the Camino de Santiago
10 Albergue The Last Stamp
Preguntoiro, 10

Private
62 15/25 Photo in Albergue The Last Stamp on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue The Last Stamp on the Camino de Santiago
11 Albergue Azabache
Azabachería, 15

Private
22 14/18 Photo in Albergue Azabache on the Camino de Santiago
12 Albergue Meiga Backpackers
Basquiños, 67

Private
30 11/13*
13 Albergue Roots & Boots
Cruceiro do Gaio, 7

Private
48 12/18 Photo in Albergue Roots & Boots on the Camino de Santiago
14 Albergue La Estrella de Santiago
Concheiros, 36-38

Private
24 10
15 Albergue Porta Real
dos Concheiros, 10

Private
24 10/15 Photo in Albergue Porta Real on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Porta Real on the Camino de Santiago
16 Albergue La Estación
Xoana Nogueira, 14

Private
24 12
17 Hostal Reis Católicos (Parador de Santiago)
Obradoiro, 1

Parador
Photo in Hostal Reis Católicos (Parador de Santiago) on the Camino de Santiago
18 Hospedería San Martín Pinario
Pl. de la Inmaculada, 3

Hotel
Photo in Hospedería San Martín Pinario on the Camino de Santiago
19 Hotel Nest Style Santiago
Doutor Teixeiro, 15

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Nest Style Santiago on the Camino de Santiago
20 Hotel Avenida
Fuente de San Antonio, 5

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Avenida on the Camino de Santiago
21 Hostal Alameda
San Clemente, 32

Hostal
Photo in Hostal Alameda on the Camino de Santiago
22 Hostal Mapoula
Entremurallas, 10-3

Hostal
Photo in Hostal Mapoula on the Camino de Santiago
23 Pensión Pazo de Argra
Calderería, 37

Pension
24 Albergue Monterrey
Fontiñas, 65a

Private
36 10/12
25 Albergue La Credencial
Fonte dos Concheiros, 13

Private
36 10/14
26 Albergue Compostela
Pedro de Mezonzo, 28

Private
27 Albergue Basquinos 45
Pedro de Mezonzo, 28

Private
28 Albergue Linares
Algalia de Abaixo, 34

Private
29 Blanco Albergue
Galeras, 30

Private
20 12