Camino Francés in Galicia | Wise Pilgrim Guide to the Camino de Santiago

Galicia / Lugo

1262

Welcome to Galicia, where the legend of Santiago was born. This northwesternmost corner of the Spanish Peninsula bears little resemblance to the type of landscape that typically comes to mind when thinking about Spain. It is wet, and very green, and the mountains that surround it have for centuries kept it isolated from the rest of the country.

O Cebreiro

Distance to Santiago: 
152.80
3.30km
Altitude: 
1292

O Cebreiro has grown from a small and ancient village of dairy farmers into a small and ancient village of large scale tourism. With luck you will arrive in a shroud of fog and leave with an abundance of sunshine; both suit this village well.

The Road: 

From the top, it is mostly downhill, though there remain a few brief climbs, all of the way to Triacastela.

History: 

It has played an important role throughout the history of the camino. It was the parish priest, Father Elías Valiña Sampedro, who is most responsible for the resurgence of the camino. It was he that first painted the yellow arrows, and the tales that surrounded him doing so are the stuff of legend. Once, in 1982, he and his white Fiat van parked along a trail in the Pyrenees. It was a time when Basque separatists were trading blows with the Guardia Civil, and when they came upon him, suspicions were aroused.

He opened the van door to reveal cans of yellow road paint and identified himself as the parish priest of O Cebreiro (a long way from home). When asked what he was doing his answer was as simple as it was prophetic: “I am preparing a great invasion!” It was he that orchestrated the installation of the granite hitos as well.

His death in 1989 meant that he only got to see the trickling start of his invasion.

The parish church is also the setting for a miracle. According to legend, The Holy Grail was hidden there and in the 14th century produced a miracle that was certified by Pope Innocent VIII. A peasant from a local village braved the hike up to O Cebreiro during a dangerous snowstorm to hear mass. The priest chastised him for endangering his life for a bit of bread and wine. At that the bread and wine turned into flesh and blood, cementing the reputation of this small hamlet.

Photo in O Cebreiro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in O Cebreiro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in O Cebreiro on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Peregrinos O Cebreiro

Xunta
104 6 Photo in Albergue de Peregrinos O Cebreiro on the Camino de Santiago
2 Casa Rural Venta Celta
O Cebreiro

Casa Rural
3 Casa Rural Valiña
O Cebreiro

Casa Rural
4 Hotel O Cebreiro
O Cebreiro

Hotel
5 Casa Rural Navarro
O Cebreiro

Casa Rural

Liñares

Distance to Santiago: 
149.50
0.70km
Altitude: 
1194

Liñares lacks the charm of O Cebreiro but offers the distinct advantage of having a new albergue. The municipal albergue in O Cebreiro has a tendency to become very crowded.

Name Beds Price
1 Casa Rural Jaime
Liñares

Casa Rural
2 Albergue Linar do Rei
Liñares

Private
20 10

Ramil

Distance to Santiago: 
132.70
Altitude: 
706

Triacastela

Distance to Santiago: 
131.80
1.70km
3.70kms.
Altitude: 
671

Triacastela is full of choices: where to eat, where to shop, where to sleep, and even how to leave town. Congratulate yourself on a job well done, the pass into Galicia has been overcome and from here on out the mountains soften in severity. Read the next note regarding the choice of options ahead.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de peregrinos de la Xunta

Xunta
56 6 Photo in Albergue de peregrinos de la Xunta on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue de Peregrinos Aitzenea
Plaza Vista Alegre, 1

Private
38 8 Photo in Albergue de Peregrinos Aitzenea on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue de Peregrinos Aitzenea on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue de Oribio
Castilla, 20

Private
27 9
4 Albergue Berce do Caminho
Camilo José Cela, 11

Private
27 8 Photo in Albergue Berce do Caminho on the Camino de Santiago
5 Complexo Xacobeo
Santiago, 8

Private
48 9 Photo in Complexo Xacobeo on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue A Horta de Abel
Peregrino, 5

Private
20 9 Photo in Albergue A Horta de Abel on the Camino de Santiago
7 Pensión Fernández
Plaza da Iglesia, 3

Pension
8 Hostal Vilasante
Camilo José Cela, 7

Hostal
9 Pensión Xacobeo
Leoncio Cadorniga, 12

Pension
10 Casa Olga
Castro, 2

Pension
11 Albergue Lemos
Castilla, 24

Private
32 9
12 Albergue Atrio
Peregrino, 1

Private
25 9

Various detours from Triacastela to Sarria

665

At the end of town when leaving Triacastela you arrive at a fork in the road, presenting two distinct ways to Sarria. Distances shown are from Triacastela, through Aguiada to Sarria.

Beyond Samos, the camino once again splits, allowing you to rejoin the Calvor and San Xil route in Aguiada. This is the preferred route as it spends the least amount of time along the roadside. Alternatively, you can stay on the road from Samos all the way to Sarria.

‌‌Via the Monastery at Samos - 25.1

Renche

Distance to Santiago: 
133.30
4.50km
Altitude: 
591
The Road: 

Pass several villages with no services: Lastres, Freituxe, and San Martiño do Real.

Lastres

Distance to Santiago: 
130.00
Altitude: 
590

Freituxe

Distance to Santiago: 
128.60
Altitude: 
581

Samos

Distance to Santiago: 
128.80
1.50km
Altitude: 
543

It is difficult to separate Samos from the monastery that dominates this small village. The monastery albergue here is reminiscent of the old albergue in Roncesvalles; one long vaulted space full of hobbling pilgrims, snoring, and laughter. I cannot recommend the experience enough.

Opposite the gas station is the Rúa do Salvador. At the end of this road are a wonderful shaded park and one of the oldest surviving buildings on the camino, the 11th century Capilla del Ciprés.

Photo in Samos on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Samos on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Peregrinos Monasterio de Samos
Monasterio de Samos, 1

Parochial
70 Donativo Photo in Albergue de Peregrinos Monasterio de Samos on the Camino de Santiago
2 Val de Samos
Compostela, 16

Private
48 11 Photo in Val de Samos on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Albaroque
Savador, 1

Private
10 9 Photo in Albergue Albaroque on the Camino de Santiago
4 Casa Forte de Lusío
Lusío, 5

Xunta
60 6
5 Albergue Casiña de Madeira
Savador, 16

Closed
16 6
6 Hotel Domus Itineres
Peregrino, 29

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Domus Itineres on the Camino de Santiago
7 Hotel A Veiga
Compostela, 61

Hotel
Photo in Hotel A Veiga on the Camino de Santiago
8 Guest House Victoria
El Salvador, 4

Hostal
Photo in Guest House Victoria on the Camino de Santiago
9 Casa Rural Licerio
Compostela, 44

Casa Rural
3 15 Photo in Casa Rural Licerio on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Casa Rural Licerio on the Camino de Santiago

◁ leave the road at the LU-641

The camino follows the road for 2km past the turn off to Perros. Where this road meets the LU-641 the camino turns Left onto a track. From here it proceeds through or near several small hamlets. The names and distances are listed here, but none offer any services and might even be mistaken for just a farm.

A Balsa

Distance to Santiago: 
129.70
5.00km
Altitude: 
740

You will notice very quickly, through both smell and sight, that dairy in these parts is the primary trade. The light brown color gives them their name, the Rubia Gallega; though you will also see an imported imposter, the Dutch Holstein.

The Road: 

Between here and San Xil you will pass a large fountain with a large scallop shell with a lot of graffiti and algae. Beyond that by two more kilometers is the Alto de Riocabo.

You will also pass through San Xil de Carballo, with no services.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue El Beso

Private
16 10 Photo in Albergue El Beso on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue El Beso on the Camino de Santiago

Montán

Distance to Santiago: 
124.70
1.00km
Altitude: 
761

You will not enter the village of Montán, but rather pass along the edge. While there is no fixed bar, there is a small picnic area with an on-again-off-again vending machine.

You will pass through Fontearcuda and Furela, no services.

Furela

Distance to Santiago: 
121.50
1.30km
Altitude: 
674

Calvor

Distance to Santiago: 
118.80
0.50km
Altitude: 
518
The Road: 

The camino does not go through Calvor, but rather passes near its Iglesia de San Estevo y San Pablo. To get to the church, turn left for a short detour once you leave Pintín. The church itself is nothing spectacular, but the site has been home to one building or another since two monks from Samos founded a church here in the 8th century. Also the view to Sarria is worth the detour.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Hospital de Calvor

Xunta
22 6 Photo in Albergue de Hospital de Calvor on the Camino de Santiago

Aguiada

Distance to Santiago: 
118.30
0.70km
Altitude: 
498
The Road: 

The remainder of the camino to Sarria is along the footpath adjacent to the road.

Sarria

Distance to Santiago: 
113.60
3.60km
Altitude: 
451

Sarria now holds the record for the most albergues in one town. Don’t be alarmed by the swell of pilgrims that appear overnight once you reach this point; the closest city to the minimum 100km point set by the church to be eligible to receive the Compostela. The effect can be dramatic during the high season and if you have been on the road for a few weeks it can be a challenge to adapt to the change.

If you have arrived early and plan to stay the night, consider the local pool as a place to pamper your feet a bit.

There are plenty of bars and restaurants along the Rúa Maior, where the bulk of the albergues are centered. To get to the grocery shopping though, you have to make your way to the main road where options abound.

The Rúa Maior evolved as a market street during the Middle Ages, due primarily to the pilgrim traffic; and this hasn’t changed. As you walk through town take a moment to admire the well-preserved coats of arms on several of the houses that line the street.

The Iglesia de Santa Maria is an unspectacular example of modern church building, but it does sit atop it’s 12th century predecessor. The Iglesia de San Salvador is recently restored and is located at the top of the Rúa Maior. Beyond it are the Convento de la Magdalena and the remains of the old Castle. The convent has roots in the 12th century and currently operates as a hospice and a primary school. The Castle is more recent, from the 15th century, and like most castles in Galicia, it is in poor shape. Only one tower remains, the rest was destroyed during the Irmandiña uprisings of 1467 (see inset). It was rebuilt, but those efforts also fell into ruin. The remnants have been re-used to pave several of Sarria’s sidewalks.

Notice: 

Along the way between Sarria and Portomarin it is common to find beggars and buskers and the occasional scam artist soliciting your support and money and signature. Do your best to avoid becoming ensnared, the best method is to keep on walking.

Also, you are advised to get your credential stamped at least twice a day between here and Santiago.

The Road: 

The camino exits town along the Rúa Maior in the old town and passes the Convento de la Magdalena. Take note that the camino actually turns left BEFORE arriving at the convent. It goes steeply downhill to the road, turns right, and soon crosses the Río Celeiro on the Ponte Áspera. It follows along the river, and in the shadow of a super bridge before crossing the train tracks. The first climb of the day (excluding the stairs in Sarria) is ahead and passes through an ancient forest full of gnarly oaks and chestnut trees.

History: 

Archeological digs in the area around Sarria have revealed the presence of a considerable pre-Roman settlement. Documentation supporting more recent inhabitations, on the other hand, is hard to come by, and the earliest written records don’t appear until the 6th century.

Whatever existed at that time was destroyed by the Muslim invasion, and the area wasn’t repopulated until around 750. The town was favored by later Kings and it received funding for several building works from Alfonso IX of León. He was its biggest supporter and he died here in 1230 and is buried in the Cathedral in Santiago.

Irmandiña Uprisings: Also known as “The Great Brotherhood War,” The Irmandiño revolts took place in 15th century Galicia against attempts by the regional nobility to maintain their rights over the peasantry and the bourgeoisie (and by a string of bad crops).

The revolts were also part of the larger phenomenon of popular revolts in late medieval Europe caused by the general economic and demographic crises in Europe during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In Galicia it meant the destruction of any type of fortified structure owned by nobility; over 130 castles were destroyed. The success of the Irmandiña revolts was mixed; the nobility fled to Castile where they rounded up reinforcements and returned to exact revenge on the leaders of the Brotherhood, but few of their former estates and strongholds were ever rebuilt.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Peregrinos de Sarria
Mayor, 31

Xunta
40 6 Photo in Albergue de Peregrinos de Sarria on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue A Pedra
Vigo de Sarria, 19

Private
15 10 Photo in Albergue A Pedra on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Don Álvaro
Mayor, 10

Private
48 9 Photo in Albergue Don Álvaro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Don Álvaro on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Dos Oito Marabedís
Conde de Lemos, 23

Private
24 10 Photo in Albergue Dos Oito Marabedís on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Los Blasones
Mayor, 31

Private
42 8 Photo in Albergue Los Blasones on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Los Blasones on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue O Durmiñento
Mayor, 44

Private
41 10 Photo in Albergue O Durmiñento on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Internacional Sarria
Mayor, 57

Private
44 10 Photo in Albergue Internacional Sarria on the Camino de Santiago
8 Albergue San Lázaro
San Lázaro, 7

Private
30 10 Photo in Albergue San Lázaro on the Camino de Santiago
9 Albergue Casa Peltre
Escalinata da Fonte, 10

Private
22 10 Photo in Albergue Casa Peltre on the Camino de Santiago
10 Albergue Monasterio de la Magdalena
Merced, 60

Private
102 10 Photo in Albergue Monasterio de la Magdalena on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Monasterio de la Magdalena on the Camino de Santiago
11 Albergue Mayor
Mayor, 64

Private
16 10 Photo in Albergue Mayor on the Camino de Santiago
12 Albergue Barbacoa del Camino
Esqueiredos, 1

Private
18 10 Photo in Albergue Barbacoa del Camino on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Barbacoa del Camino on the Camino de Santiago
13 Alma do Camiño
Calvo Sotelo, 199

Private
100 9 Photo in Alma do Camiño on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Alma do Camiño on the Camino de Santiago
14 Albergue Obradoiro
Mayor, 49

Private
38 8 Photo in Albergue Obradoiro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Obradoiro on the Camino de Santiago
15 Albergue Credencial
Peregrino, 50

Private
28 9 Sarria - Albergue Credencial
16 Albergue Puente Ribeira
Peregrino, 23

Private
50 Photo in Albergue Puente Ribeira on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Puente Ribeira on the Camino de Santiago
17 Albergue Matías
Mayor, 4

Private
40 9 Photo in Albergue Matías on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Matías on the Camino de Santiago
18 Albergue O Antoxo
Calvo Sotelo, 211

Private
Sarria - Albergue O Antoxo
19 Albergue Oasis
Vigo de Sarria, 12

Private
27 10 Photo in Albergue Oasis on the Camino de Santiago
20 Pensión La Estación
Matías López, 106

Pension
Photo in Pensión La Estación on the Camino de Santiago
21 Pensión Casa Matías
Calvo Sotelo, 39

Pension
Photo in Pensión Casa Matías on the Camino de Santiago
22 La Pensión de Ana
Cimo da Agra, 11

Pension
Photo in La Pensión de Ana on the Camino de Santiago
23 Matias Rooms
Rosalía de Castro, 19

Pension
Photo in Matias Rooms on the Camino de Santiago
24 Hostal dpCristal
Calvo Sotelo, 198

Hostal
Photo in Hostal dpCristal on the Camino de Santiago
25 Hotel Alfonso IX
Peregrino, 29

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Alfonso IX on the Camino de Santiago
26 Hotel Mar de Plata
Formigueiros, 5

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Mar de Plata on the Camino de Santiago
27 Albergue La Casona de Sarria
San Lázaro, 24

Private
15 10/12 Photo in Albergue La Casona de Sarria on the Camino de Santiago
28 Albergue Casino
Mayor, 65

Private
28 10 Photo in Albergue Casino on the Camino de Santiago

Vilei

Distance to Santiago: 
110.00
0.40km
Altitude: 
522

Vilei is often mismarked as Barbadelo on the map and in guidebooks. They are distinct hamlets, less than 1km apart. It has grown into quite a pilgrim stop from the abandoned hamlet it once was. It now counts two albergues and a trinket shop and is a pleasant place to stay if you find Sarria to be overcrowded. It is also the first coffee since Sarria.

History: 

Vilei and many of the small hamlets throughout Galicia have always been the agricultural heart of Galicia, working primarily in the dairy industry. Pilgrims come and go, and nothing for them changes much. These clusters of inhabited places are called caserios, and in many cases they number only a few houses and a small chapel.

Photo in Vilei on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Vilei on the Camino de Santiago

Barbadelo

Distance to Santiago: 
109.60
1.90km
Altitude: 
549

Barbadelo, small as it is, once housed a monastery in 874. The current church dates from the 12th century and has several quality sculptures, including the animals carved into the north portal. It is 50m off the camino to your left, signed.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Barbadelo

Xunta
18 6 Photo in Albergue de Barbadelo on the Camino de Santiago
2 A Casa de Carmen

Private
32 10 Photo in A Casa de Carmen on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue O Pombal

Private
8 10

Rente

Distance to Santiago: 
108.40
Altitude: 
594

Mercado da Serra

Distance to Santiago: 
107.70
6.10km
Altitude: 
630
The Road: 

The camino passes through the hamlets of Leimán, Peruscallo, Cortiñas, Lavandeira, Casal, and Brea. None have any services. The way is more gently rolling hills.

Between here and Morgade you may find, behind a fence on your right-hand side, a rather curious and grumpy ostrich. Ostrich meat is a growing industry in Spain, but this particular fella is the family pet.

History: 

A curious place for a medieval market, but that is exactly what this crossing of roads is known and named for.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Molino de Marzán

Private
16 10 Photo in Albergue Molino de Marzán on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Molino de Marzán on the Camino de Santiago

Leimán

Distance to Santiago: 
105.50
Altitude: 
628

Peruscallo

Distance to Santiago: 
104.60
Altitude: 
633

Cortiñas

Distance to Santiago: 
103.70
Altitude: 
636

Lavandeira

Distance to Santiago: 
103.30
Altitude: 
642

Casal

Distance to Santiago: 
103.20
Altitude: 
635

Brea

Distance to Santiago: 
102.20
Altitude: 
659

Ferreiros

Distance to Santiago: 
100.20
0.10km
Altitude: 
660

As the name implies, Ferreiros was once home to a notable blacksmithing trade. More recently it was another center for small dairy production, and that industry has given way to supporting pilgrims.

The Road: 

Beyond Ferreiros you will encounter the 100km marker. It is the single most vandalized object on the camino, changing from day to day as pilgrims leave their mark. From here on to Santiago the terrain has smoothed out, but do not be deceived. Although the height of the peaks has been reduced, the frequency with which you have to climb the smaller ones has increased.

Ferreiros - Camino de Santiago - 1Ferreiros - Camino de Santiago - 1
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Ferreiro

Xunta
22 6 Ferreiros - Albergue de Ferreiro
2 Albergue Casa Cruceiro
Ferreiros, 2

Private
18 10 Photo in Albergue Casa Cruceiro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Casa Cruceiro on the Camino de Santiago

Mirallos

Distance to Santiago: 
100.10
0.70km
Altitude: 
638

At the bottom of the hill from Ferreiros, there is a bar and a church/cemetery.

Photo in Mirallos on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue O Mirallos
Mirallos, 2

Private
20 Donativo

Pena

Distance to Santiago: 
99.40
2.60km
Altitude: 
644

Not much in town apart from the well-kept albergue/bar Casa do Rego.

Photo in Pena on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Casa do Rego
Aldea A Pena, 4

Private
6 10 Photo in Albergue Casa do Rego on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Casa do Rego on the Camino de Santiago

Rozas

Distance to Santiago: 
98.70
Altitude: 
639
Rozas - Camino de Santiago - 1

Moimentos

Distance to Santiago: 
97.30
Altitude: 
580

Mercadoiro

Distance to Santiago: 
96.80
0.10km
Altitude: 
547

Another bar-and-albergue-only kind of town, run by some fellows from Valencia and the most promising place to find paella on the menu.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Mercadoiro
Aldea de Mercadoiro, 2

Private
36 10

Moutras

Distance to Santiago: 
96.70
3.00km
Altitude: 
534

The small shop/cafe here wins the award for flair. It is run by an artist who hand paints camino shells and other souvenir items. Rock and roll sello.

The Road: 

You will pass through Parrocha, no services.

Photo in Moutras on the Camino de Santiago

Parrocha

Distance to Santiago: 
95.00
Altitude: 
488

Vilachá

Distance to Santiago: 
93.70
2.00km
Altitude: 
425

There are no shops of any kind in Vilachá, the last town before Portomarin. However, Casa Banderas sells drinks and snacks at the front gate.

The Road: 

The camino will soon bring you within sight of Portomarín. You will also pass through the town of Vilachá before beginning the rather steep descent into the valley of the Río Miño and across the modern bridge to Portomarín.

The camino into town passes over the new bridge. The old bridge spends most of its time submerged beneath the river below but by the end of summer it emerges as the water level drops. Up the stairs and through the small chapel, you are almost into town. It is a bit more uphill still.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Casa Banderas

Private
10 10 Photo in Albergue Casa Banderas on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Casa Banderas on the Camino de Santiago

Portomarín

Distance to Santiago: 
91.70
7.50km
Altitude: 
388

Portomarín holds the distinction of being the newest oldest town along the camino. The Portomarín we see today is a transplanted version of the original town that originally settled in the valley below. Most of the town is new construction, but the church and a few smaller buildings were relocated stone by stone. Close inspection of the Iglesia de San Juan shows that the stones were numbered to avoid head scratching later.
The Embalse de Belasar sits beneath the bridge, a swollen version of the recently (‘56) dammed Río Miño.

The Iglesia of San Juan (also known as the Iglesia of San Nicolás) is an imposing fortress in the center of town. It is the largest single-nave Romanesque church in Galicia. The Ayuntamiento building in the main square was once the Casa del Conde from the 16th century. The Iglesia de Santa María (also known as La Virgen de las Nieves) is the chapel that you passed under at the top of the stairs going into town; the local people believe that it will protect them from drowning.

Notice: 

Be aware of high-speed traffic as you are required to cross back and forth across the main road.

The Road: 

From the square simply head downhill along the colonnaded street and stick to it until you arrive at the main road. DO NOT keep going straight. Rather turn left and head back in the direction of the bridge into town. Before you get there arrows will direct you onto a different bridge over a small river that feeds the reservoir. At the end of the bridge are two options: TURN RIGHT. From here it is a steadily uphill march all the way to Gonzar, passing Toxibo with its hórreo along the way. After passing through a stretch of forest the camino returns to the main road and parallels it on a gravel track. This track crosses back and forth over the main road on several occasions. Be mindful of traffic here, particularly during the morning hours when the area can be thick with fog.

History: 

Portomarín gets its name from ‘porto’ or river crossing, and ‘marín’, a reference to the Sanctuary of St. Marina that was located here in the Middle Ages. It enjoyed its peak of prosperity in the 15th and 16th centuries when several of the Catholic Monarchs slept here. The nearby capital of Lugo, also a Roman settlement, grew at a greater pace and Portomarín was quickly forgotten. As recently as 1919 the town was still not connected by a single road that could accommodate wheeled traffic. That has changed, and the prosperity of the town can now be attributed to the reservoir and the camino.

Photo in Portomarín on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Portomarín on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Portomarín
Carretera de Lugo

Xunta
110 6
2 Albergue Ferramenteiro
Chantada, 3

Private
130 10
3 Albergue El Caminante
Benigno Quiroga, 6

Private
46 10
4 Albergue PortoSantiago
Diputación, 8

Private
14 10 Photo in Albergue PortoSantiago on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue O Mirador
Peregrino, 27

Private
29 10 Photo in Albergue O Mirador on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue Manuel
Miño, 1

Private
16 10 Photo in Albergue Manuel on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Ultreia Portomarin
Diputación, 9

Private
26 10 Photo in Albergue Ultreia Portomarin on the Camino de Santiago
8 Novo Porto
Benigno Quiroga, 12

Private
22 10
9 Albergue Villamartín
Miño, 14

Private
20 10
10 Albergue Folgueira
Chantada, 18

Private
32 10 Photo in Albergue Folgueira on the Camino de Santiago
11 Pensión Portomiño
Sarria, 2

Pension
Photo in Pensión Portomiño on the Camino de Santiago
12 Albergue Casa Cruz
Benigno Quiroga, 16

Private
16 10 Photo in Albergue Casa Cruz on the Camino de Santiago
13 Pensión Posada del Camino
Lugo, 1

Pension
14 Hotel Villajardín
Miño, 14

Hotel
15 Hotel Ferramenteiro
Chantada, 3

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Ferramenteiro on the Camino de Santiago
16 Albergue Casa do Marabillas
Camiño do Monte, 3

Private
20 15*
17 Albergue Aqua Portomarín
Barreiros, 2

Private
16 10
18 Albergue Pons Minea
Sarria, 11

Private
36 10 Photo in Albergue Pons Minea on the Camino de Santiago
19 Pensión Mar
Fraga Iribarne, 5

Pension
20 Albergue Pasiño a Pasiño
Compostela, 25

Private
30 10

Toxibo

Distance to Santiago: 
87.40
Altitude: 
501

Hórreo: If you pronounce this word like OREO you are pretty close. Hórreos are everywhere in northern Spain, from the smallest of hamlets to the largest of private estates. They vary in design from region to region and in Galicia they tend to stretch out lengthwise. They function as corn-cribs, with slatted walls that allow for circulation and a foundation designed to prevent rodents from climbing up. They range in length from 2m to 35m.

Gonzar

Distance to Santiago: 
84.20
1.30km
Altitude: 
546

Gonzar is notable for the number of Bovines kept there, far more than the human population.

The bar along the road can be miserably swamped, but if you go a short way into town you can enjoy a coffee at Casa Garcia (next to the church) with its beautiful courtyard and quiet atmosphere and its bathroom without a queue.

The Road: 

The camino leaves along the road but departs from it quite quickly. You will find that it does this often; the arrows have been placed in a manner which keeps you as far from heavy traffic as possible.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Privado de Gonzar - Casa Garcia
Gonzar, 8

Private
20 10
2 Albergue de Gonzar
Carretera

Xunta
28 6 Gonzar - Albergue de Gonzar

Castromayor

Distance to Santiago: 
82.90
2.40km
Altitude: 
601
The Road: 

Shortly beyond the village, a mere 50m off the camino to your left, are the remains of the Iron Age castro that gives the town its name. It is seldom visited (there are no signs) but is worth an exploration. It can be found before the point where you meet the main road.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Pensión Casa Maruja
Castromaior

Pension
2 Albergue Ortiz
Castromaior, 2

Private
18 10

Hospital de la Cruz

Distance to Santiago: 
80.50
1.60km
Altitude: 
678
The Road: 

When leaving Hospital de la Cruz it is important to pay close attention to the traffic. The camino crosses a large roundabout, goes over the highway, and then turns left. At this point, you are actually walking along the highway on-ramp, though only for a short distance. It turns right and continues the upward march towards Ventas de Naron.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Hospital da Cruz
Antiguas Escuelas

Xunta
32 6
2 Hostal El Labrador
Alto Hospital, 2

Hostal

Ventas de Narón

Distance to Santiago: 
78.90
3.00km
Altitude: 
703

The bar O Cruceiro opens at 6 am, and there is a wonderful fountain in the picnic area. The small chapel here has a stamp, which is given by its blind caretaker with a bit of help from you.

The land in this area is poor for farming as the soil is rich with quartz and feldspar. The ridge that you are walking towards is the watershed between the Río Miño (behind you, which empties into the Atlantic near Guarda) and the Río Ulla (ahead of you, and which empties into the Atlantic near Padron). The area is covered thickly with broom.

History: 

The year 820 was an important one for Ventas de Naron, and for Christian Spain. For Ventas, it was the site of a battle between the Muslim and Christian forces. The Muslim forces aimed to expand their territory to the north and the Christians, led by the Asturian King Alfonso II the chaste, sent them back. For Christian Spain, it was also the year that the bones of our favorite Apostle were rediscovered. Not long after the very same Alfonso would become the first pilgrim (the primitivo), would verify the relics, would build a church to house them, and would set in motion a course of events that would see the remaining Muslim forces defeated.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Casa Molar
Ventas de Narón, 8

Private
18 10 Photo in Albergue Casa Molar on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Casa Molar on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue O Cruceiro
Ventas de Narón, 6

Private
30 10 Photo in Albergue O Cruceiro on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue O Cruceiro on the Camino de Santiago

A Prebisa

Distance to Santiago: 
76.90
Altitude: 
663

Lameiros

Distance to Santiago: 
76.50
Altitude: 
642

Ligonde

Distance to Santiago: 
75.90
1.10km
Altitude: 
628
History: 

Locals say that the field on your right at the start of town is a pilgrim cemetery. There doesn’t seem to be any commemoration of that fact, or protection of the site either. Whether it is or is not a cemetery seems less important than the insight gained by remembering how dangerous a pilgrimage of this sort could be.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Peregrinos Escuela de Ligonde

Xunta
20 8
2 Albergue Fuente del Peregrino
Ligonde, 4

Association
9 Donativo Photo in Albergue Fuente del Peregrino on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Fuente del Peregrino on the Camino de Santiago

Eirexe [Airexe]

Distance to Santiago: 
74.80
2.00km
Altitude: 
632
History: 

Eucalyptus: The Eucalyptus tree, indigenous to Australia, was brought to Galicia in 1865 for the construction trade. It proved to be a poor choice and is now used to produce paper (most of it is shipped to the mills in Portugal). The Galicians have a love/hate relationship with this invasive species and you will find the occasional message of “Eucalyptus Non!” sprayed on buildings. There are no natural controls for the tree, which grows fast, drives out local species (oak and chestnut), and which are extremely flammable during dry seasons.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Eirexe
Eirexe, 17

Xunta
20 6 Photo in Albergue de Eirexe on the Camino de Santiago
2 Pension Eirexe

Pension
4 10

Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador

583

‌Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador

After passing the bar of Portos, turn right along a gravel road. There is a fork at 500m, keep left and continue strait over the N-547. To the church and back is 4.5km.

Guided tours are offered by a local, and in some cases even when the church is otherwise closed. The official hours are:

Winter (November through March): 12-17:30 CLOSED MONDAYS
Summer (April through October): 11-14 & 16-20 CLOSED MONDAYS.

Photo of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de Santiago
Photo of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto of Detour to Vilar de Donas and La Iglesia de El Salvador on the Camino de Santiago

Os Valos

Distance to Santiago: 
71.40
Altitude: 
634

Mamurria

Distance to Santiago: 
70.80
Altitude: 
615

Brea

Distance to Santiago: 
70.20
2.80km
Altitude: 
621

Brea is Gallego for road, and is a very common name for a small village.

The Road: 

From here the camino passes through more forests and nears the road at Rosario.

Rosario

Distance to Santiago: 
68.80
Altitude: 
626
The Road: 

Along the descent from here you will pass Os Chacotes, a recreational area with a log-cabin style hotel and sports facilities. At the entrance to Sarria is the Iglesia de San Tirso, where a stamp is available. From there it is down a set of stairs into town.

Palas de Rei

Distance to Santiago: 
67.40
1.60km
Altitude: 
558

Palas is bisected by a pair of large roads which twist and turn through town. After coming down the staircase, and with the municipal albergue on your left, the road to the right leads to a grocery and back to Portomarin. Straight on to bars and restaurants and albergues and the road out of town.

The Road: 

You have now entered eucalyptus territory, and although there are patches of old oak forests to be found this non-indigenous species has taken over the landscape and has become a symbol of Galicia.

History: 

The origin of the name Palas de Rei, ‘Palace of the King’, is owed to the last Visigothic king to rule Spain. Witiza had a brief reign, from 700-709, and he was only 14 when he was anointed. The family ruled all of the Iberian peninsula from Toledo and it wasn’t until 701 that Witiza came to Galicia, likely to Tui; his migration was prompted by both a Byzantine invasion and the spread of the plague from Constantinople. His reign was short lived but his namesake village here on the camino remains. For the record, he was, in fact, a co-ruler alongside his father, but ‘Palace of the Half King’ lacked a certain flair.

Photo in Palas de Rei on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Palas de Rei
Carretera de Compostela, 19

Xunta
60 6 Photo in Albergue de Palas de Rei on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue de Palas de Rei on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Buen Camino
Peregrino, 3

Private
41 10 Photo in Albergue Buen Camino on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Buen Camino on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Os Chacotes
Carretera de Compostela, 19

Xunta
112 6 Photo in Albergue Os Chacotes on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Mesón de Benito
Paz

Private
80 10 Photo in Albergue Mesón de Benito on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Mesón de Benito on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue San Marcos
Next to church

Private
71 10 Palas de Rei - Albergue San Marcos
6 Albergue Castro
Ourense, 24

Private
56 10 Palas de Rei - Albergue Castro
7 Albergue Outeiro
Plaza de Galicia, 25

Private
50 10
8 Hostal Ponterroxán
Compostela, 109

Hostal
Photo in Hostal Ponterroxán on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pensión Palas
San Tirso

Pension
Photo in Pensión Palas on the Camino de Santiago
10 Complejo la Cabaña
Doctor Pardo Ouro, 4

Casa Rural
Photo in Complejo la Cabaña on the Camino de Santiago
11 Albergue A Casiña di Marcello
Camiño da Aldeia de Abaixo

Private
14 10 Photo in Albergue A Casiña di Marcello on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue A Casiña di Marcello on the Camino de Santiago
12 Hostel O Castelo
Cruceiro, 14

Hostal
Photo in Hostel O Castelo on the Camino de Santiago
13 Pensión Bar Plaza
Compostela, 21

Pension
Photo in Pensión Bar Plaza on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Pensión Bar Plaza on the Camino de Santiago
14 Pensión Casa Curro
Ourense, 15

Pension
15 Pension Casa Camiño
Peregrino, 10

Pension
16 Casa Carla
La Paz, 3

Casa Rural
17 Albergue Zendoira
Amado Losada, 10

Private
50 10

San Xulian

Distance to Santiago: 
63.80
1.10km
Altitude: 
467
Notice: 

A small one horse town, the bar and albergue here are not likely to open before noon.

The Road: 

Near San Xulain the camino is undergoing a rerouting to accommodate the new highway connecting Santiago with Lugo. Most recently this meant walking across the unfinished highway. Changes are frequent and it is best to follow the detour signage.

History: 

Saint Julian is one of the favored Saints of the camino and is the patron of hospitallers and hoteliers. The legend that surrounds his calling to the camino is a dark one: As a young noblemen fond of hunting, he receives a prophecy (by a deer no less) that he would kill his own parents. A believer, young Julian decides to put distance between himself and his parents, getting as far away as Portugal. He finds both work and favor from the King and is married to a young widow. By a most remarkable circumstance of chance, his parents in the meanwhile had set off looking for him only to find his young wife at home alone. The wife, of course, was overjoyed to realize the family connection and immediately welcomed Julian’s parents into the home and went as far as to offer them rest in her bed while she went to church for her prayers. When Julian returns home to find two people in his marital bed, he slays them both in a rage. Of course, it doesn’t take long for him to realize his mistake, to curse that deer, and to begin his own pilgrimage to Rome seeking forgiveness. That forgiveness would not come easily; the Pope declared that he would have to care for pilgrims along the road to Santiago. He then returned and with his wife set up a hospice to do as the Pope demanded. He got more than forgiveness for his labors and so did his wife, both were canonized. He, of course, is St. Julian and his wife St. Basilisa. All of this makes for great storytelling of course, but the church itself is undecided on the veracity of it. There are several Julians, and surprisingly several Basilisa’s, and chances are good that this tale takes the best of each.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue O Abrigadoiro
San Xulian do Camiño

Private
18 12

Ponte Campaña

Distance to Santiago: 
62.70
1.10km
Altitude: 
422
History: 

Pontecampaña is the setting for a bloody battle which was fought between Fernán Ruiz de Castro (on behalf of King Pedro I of Castile) and Pedro’s half-brother Enrique II. It was 1370 and the resulting feud left ‘rivers of blood.’ Of note today are the remains of the ancient granite bridge over the Río Pambre.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Casa Domingo
Aldea de Pontecampaña - Mato

Private
18 10

Leboreiro

Distance to Santiago: 
58.10
3.90km
Altitude: 
449

Leboreiro is one of the more charming hamlets along this stretch of road. It is sparsely populated but well maintained. The small Romanesque Iglesia de Santa María de las Nieves has a nice tympanum. Also of note is the first cabaceiro, a small woven structure with a thatched roof that serves the same function as an hórreo.

History: 

The church is also surrounded by legend. It is a familiar one, retold in similar churches and capillas all across Europe. It is the legend of the Virgin that moves in the night. It tells of a mysterious spring that emerged suddenly and which glowed at night. In their search for the source of the spring, the villagers unearthed the statue of the Virgin. They built a chapel nearby (the one we see today) and moved the Virgin to it. Every night she moved back, unhappy in her new home. Unhappy that is until a clever sculptor correctly interpreted her move as a desire to be outside, he carved a figure of the Virgin into the tympanum and the statue has remained at the altar ever since.

Furelos

Distance to Santiago: 
54.20
1.50km
Altitude: 
418

In addition to the Iglesia de San Juan, with its uncommon crucifix, Furelos has a bridge and a bar. Both are impressive, the former for dating back to the Romans, and the latter for the tortillas.

History: 

The village and its pilgrims hospice were under the ownership of the Hospitallers of San Juan in the 12th century. The Iglesia de San Juan is worth visiting for its quite interesting crucifix which depicts Jesus not with his hands outstretched to his sides, but rather with one hand reaching up to the Heavens and the other down to Earth.

Photo in Furelos on the Camino de Santiago
Things to see
Iglesia de San Juan Photo of Iglesia de San Juan on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto of Iglesia de San Juan on the Camino de Santiago

Melide

Distance to Santiago: 
52.70
5.80km
Altitude: 
456

Although it has been on the menu as far back as O Cebreiro, Pulpo (octopus) doesn’t seem to garnish much attention until Melide. Despite its apparent disconnect with the sea, Melide’s thriving Thursday market meant that shipping pulpo was a profitable enterprise. It is served today as it was then: on a wooden plate, garnished only with a healthy drizzle of olive oil and a shake of paprika. It is eaten with a rather crude looking toothpick, alongside heavy Galician bread and a bowl of the local Ribeiro wine.

One of the better places to try it is Pulpería a Garnacha, the last door on your left before you get to the main road in Melide.

Melide, long the crossroads between territories, is also the meeting point of the various camino routes which come from the north, including the part of the Camino del Norte and the Camino Primitivo. Because of this, and the proximity to Santiago, the road become a great deal more congested.

The melindre is another of Melide’s favorite foods. It resembles a glazed donut and is sold from dozens of identical booths during festivals.

The Road: 

The traffic through Melide can be dangerous, particularly on market days. The arrows through town can be difficult to spot. Simply follow along with the main road to the first roundabout. If you have not yet crossed the main road do so at the roundabout, and then cross the road that runs perpendicular to it. Arrows should point you towards a small side street through the old part of town that parallels the main road.

There are many other yellow arrows that direct you towards the many albergues in town, they are often attached to adverts or are painted alongside a simple ‘A’. These can be ignored.

History: 

Melide is an ancient settlement and despite its importance as a natural crossroad since Neolithic times, it has never been protected by a wall. In Medieval times the overwhelming bulk of the town industries were tied to the camino. This is evident today in the way the town is shaped; stretched out lengthwise along the camino road.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Melide
San Antonio, 25

Xunta
156 6
2 Albergue O Apalpador
San Antonio, 23

Private
30 10 Photo in Albergue O Apalpador on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue O Apalpador on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Pereiro
Progreso, 43

Private
40 6/10
4 Albergue O Cruceiro
Ronda de A Coruña, 2

Private
72 10 Photo in Albergue O Cruceiro on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Melide
Lugo, 92

Private
57 10 Photo in Albergue Melide on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue O Apalpador II
Cantón de San Roque, 9

Private
32 10 Photo in Albergue O Apalpador II on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue O Apalpador II on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Vilela
San Antonio, 2

Private
28 10 Photo in Albergue Vilela on the Camino de Santiago
8 Albergue San Anton
San Antonio, 6

Private
36 10 Photo in Albergue San Anton on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue San Anton on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pensión Xaneiro
La Habana, 43

Pension
Photo in Pensión Xaneiro on the Camino de Santiago
10 Pensión Berenguela
San Roque, 2

Pension
11 Hotel Pousada Chiquitín
San Antón, 18

Hotel
16 30-70 Photo in Hotel Pousada Chiquitín on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Hotel Pousada Chiquitín on the Camino de Santiago
12 Pensión El Molino
Castro, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión El Molino on the Camino de Santiago
13 B&B A Lúa do Camiño
Circunvalación - Campo da Feira

Casa Rural
Photo in B&B A Lúa do Camiño on the Camino de Santiago
14 Hotel Carlos 96
Lugo, 119

Hotel
15 Hotel Sony
Santiago

Hotel
16 Albergue Alfonso II
Toques y Friol, 52-54

Private
34 10 Photo in Albergue Alfonso II on the Camino de Santiago
17 Albergue Arraigos
Cantón San Roque, 9

Private
20 10
18 Albergue Montoto
Codeseira, 31

Private
42 10

Raído

Distance to Santiago: 
49.40
Altitude: 
453

A Peroxa

Distance to Santiago: 
47.20
Altitude: 
415

Boente

Distance to Santiago: 
46.90
2.80km
Altitude: 
392

The first building in Boente on your left is the Bar de los Alemanes, and this is the best bar in town. Further down the hill, the camino crosses the main road (caution) where two albergues and a few bars are located.

You can get a sello in the Iglesia de Santiago de Boente, and curiously enough the entrance that most pilgrims use leads directly to the sacristy. A collection of hundreds of prayer cards from around the world adorn the walls, and if the priest is not there to stamp your credencial he leaves it out for you to take matters into your own hands.

The Road: 

Walking past the church the camino turns right and descends more. The hills ahead are steep in both directions, take it easy.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Os Albergues

Private
30 11 Photo in Albergue Os Albergues on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Boente
En frente de la Iglesia

Private
22 10

Castañeda

Distance to Santiago: 
44.10
2.50km
Altitude: 
382
The Road: 

It is uphill once more, followed by a steady descent into the valley below, steep at points.

History: 

It is said that the ovens that produced lime for the construction of the Cathedral were here in Castañeda. Pilgrims carried the raw materials here from Triacastela and swapped it for lime which they carried to Santiago.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Santiago

Private
6 1 Photo in Albergue Santiago on the Camino de Santiago

Ribadiso da Baixo

Distance to Santiago: 
41.60
0.80km
Altitude: 
305

A bar near the river with a large patio for celebrating a successful walk. The river here is quite cold and the perfect place to dip your feet.

The Road: 

The camino to Arzúa begins with a steady walk uphill. By the time you reach the road it levels out and the remaining kilometers are flat into town.

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Ribadiso da Baixo
Ribadiso de Baixo

Municipal
70 6 Photo in Albergue de Ribadiso da Baixo on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Los Caminantes
Ribadiso de Baixo

Private
56 10 Photo in Albergue Los Caminantes on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Los Caminantes on the Camino de Santiago

Arzúa

Distance to Santiago: 
38.50
2.30km
Altitude: 
386

Arzúa is a pleasant town with almost enough beds for pilgrims. If you find everything to be full and don’t feel like splurging on one of the many hotels in the area, the Polideportivo (sports hall) is often used to house pilgrims.

Between here and O Pedrouzo lie a string of very small Galician hamlets of little note. The locals in these parts enjoy telling you, without the slightest tone of irony or sarcasm, that ‘no hay vacas in Galicia’ (there are no cows in Galicia). Hold that thought in your head while you slosh through a soggy trail on an otherwise sunny day.

Fiesta: 

Famous for its cheese, Arzúa hosts an annual (and three day long) Festival of Cheese in March. They have been doing so for 40 years.

The Road: 

The camino leaves Arzúa along a footpath, NOT the road. If you arrived at the main square, walk past the church (with your back to the road) and turn right onto the side street. The terrain is pleasant, a blend of trails and paved roads through small towns and lots of forests. There are a few steep sections but none of any considerable length.

History: 

Connecting Arzúa to the Camino de Santiago during Medieval times is an imperfect science. There is no mention of a town with that name, only one in the area called Villanova. Scholars widely agree that the absence of any other Villanova in the area, and the presence of two Romanesque churches in Arzúa, are clues enough that they are one and the same.

If so, Arzúa has the unfortunate distinction of being the town with a poor reputation for hospitality towards pilgrims. A story tells of a hungry pilgrim who begged a local woman for a piece of the bread she was baking. She refused, and he cursed the loaf; turning it to stone.

Tetilla Cheese: You might have seen this curiously shaped cheese in the shop windows. If you made a connection between the name and the shape you are not mistaken. It was shaped this way by cheese makers in protest to the bishop of Santiago. At the time the Portico de la Gloria (Master Mateo’s famous sculptures at the Cathedrals main entrance) was being finished and the bishop took issue with the odd smile on the prophet Daniels’ face. The clever bishop followed his gaze across the doorway and found that Queen Esther’s bosom was augmented by a cheeky sculptor. Daniel kept his smile, Esther had a reduction, and we got boob-shaped-protest-cheese.

Photo in Arzúa on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Arzúa
Cima de Lugar, 6

Xunta
46 6 Photo in Albergue de Arzúa on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Ultreia
Lugo, 126

Private
38 10* Photo in Albergue Ultreia on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue Via Lactea
José Antonio, 26

Private
120 10/12 Photo in Albergue Via Lactea on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Via Lactea on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Don Quijote
Lugo, 130

Private
50 10 Photo in Albergue Don Quijote on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue da Fonte
Carme, 18

Private
20 10/12 Photo in Albergue da Fonte on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue Santiago Apóstol (Arzúa)
Lugo, 107

Private
72 10/12
7 Albergue Los Caminantes
Santiago, 14

Private
28 10
8 De Camino Albergue
Lugo, 118

Private
46 10 Photo in De Camino Albergue on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in De Camino Albergue on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pazo Santa María
O Pazo

Hotel
Photo in Pazo Santa María on the Camino de Santiago
10 Hotel Suiza
Vello

Hotel
11 Pensión Mesón do Peregrino
Ramón Franco, 7

Pension
12 Pensión Rúa
Lugo, 130

Pension
13 Pensión Casa Teodora
Lugo, 38

Pension
14 O Albergue de Selmo
Lugo, 133

Private
50 10
15 La Casona de Nené
Padre Pardo, 24

Hotel
16 Pensión Cima do Lugar
Cima do Lugar, 22

Pension

Calle - O Outeiro

Distance to Santiago: 
30.80
1.40km
Altitude: 
346

Calle is a town forsaken by modernization. Apart from a pair of bars, it does not appear that much has changed in recent centuries. The camino twists and turns through it, crossing a small creek next to a large wash basin.

Salceda

Distance to Santiago: 
27.60
2.60km
Altitude: 
367

There are a pair of bars in Salceda, and a restaurant (La Esquipa) that is thick with pilgrims every day but Monday when it is closed.

Notice: 

The camino rejoins the road in Salceda, and while it does not walk on the road it does remain quite close. In fact, the camino crosses the road several times between here and Santiago. The speed of traffic, the curves in the road, and the abundance of pilgrims makes this the most dangerous stretch along the camino. Cross carefully and quickly and always under the road when possible.

The Road: 

The camino leaves town to the right of a wedge shaped park next to La Esquipa, not along the road.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue Touristico de Salceda
Calzada

Private
8 in albergue 28 in pension 10/12 Photo in Albergue Touristico de Salceda on the Camino de Santiago
2 El Albergue de Boni
N-547, km 75.5

Private
30 10
3 Albergue Alborada
N-547

Private
10 12

Empalme

Distance to Santiago: 
23.40
1.00km
Altitude: 
407

Several roadside bars that cater to trucker and pilgrim alike.

Notice: 

CAUTION crossing the road, dangerous intersection.

The Road: 

The camino crosses the main road at the highest point in the road, there is no marked crosswalk and the arrows on the other side of the road are often obscured by parked cars. You may see pilgrims continuing along the road but are advised against following them as the camino returns to the trail when you turn off the road.

Half way down the hill it splits and arrows indicate that you should either turn left to go under the road or continue straight. Unless you have reason to visit Santa Irene you can keep on straight and avoid the hassle of crossing back over the road. If you continue straight you will arrive at the important part of Santa Irene (the part with the bar).

Name Beds Price
1 Albergue Andaina

Private
14 10

A Rúa [O Pino]

Distance to Santiago: 
21.00
1.60km
Altitude: 
279
The Road: 

Where the camino returns to the road at the start of O Pedrouzo you will find an abundance of arrows and a large map which is nearly worthless. Arrows and dozens of signs advertising various hostels and hotels point in every direction. If you have a reservation, review the map to find the best path, otherwise turn left up the road. If you are not staying the night in Pedrouzo, cross the road here and continue along the camino.

◁ into Pedrouzo or △ along camino

260

After passing through A Rua the camino meets up with the N-547.

Turn left here if you intend to stay in Pedrouzo or use any of it's services. From the center of town the camino will turn right to eventually rejoin the track that continues straight across the road towards a sports complex and at least one bar.

O Pedrouzo [Arca do Pino]

Distance to Santiago: 
19.40
0.70km
Altitude: 
282

Unfortunately, there is little to say about this modernized town. When it comes to charm, or monuments, or outrageous legends, it comes up short. During the busier periods along the camino the town feels overrun with pilgrims; most of whom are excited to have finished their penultimate day of walking.

Notice: 

Avoid the temptation of following the main road out of Pedrouzo. There are very few arrows to get you back to the camino and following along the road puts you in very real danger and takes you away from a lovely forest walk. See note below to get back to the camino.

The Road: 

If you spent the night in Arca, it is important to find your way back to the camino proper which runs through the forest to the north. To get to it, find the intersection of the main road and Calle de Condello (where the Casa do Concello is located). Continue uphill (north from here) and in a few hundred meters the camino presents itself. Turn left and continue through the forest to Amenal.

The camino between here and Santiago is a mixture of rural and urban settings, some forests and some sprawl. The up and downs that you have been experiencing continue: the elevation gain/loss is +308/-339m, a not insignificant amount.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue de Arca do Pino
Pedrouzo

Xunta
120 6 Photo in Albergue de Arca do Pino on the Camino de Santiago
2 Albergue Porta de Santiago
Lugo, 11

Private
60 10 Photo in Albergue Porta de Santiago on the Camino de Santiago
3 Albergue O Burgo
Lugo, 47

Private
14 10 Photo in Albergue O Burgo on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue Edreira
Fonte, 19

Private
40 10 Photo in Albergue Edreira on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Edreira on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Otero
Forcarei, 2

Private
36 10 Photo in Albergue Otero on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Otero on the Camino de Santiago
6 Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo
Iglesia, 7

Private
94 10 Photo in Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Cruceiro de Pedrouzo on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue REM
Iglesia, 7

Private
40 10 Photo in Albergue REM on the Camino de Santiago
8 Hotel O Pino
A Rúa, 9

Hotel
Photo in Hotel O Pino on the Camino de Santiago
9 Pensión Una Estrella Dorada
Lugo, 10

Pension
Photo in Pensión Una Estrella Dorada on the Camino de Santiago
10 Pensión Maribel
Mollados, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión Maribel on the Camino de Santiago
11 Pensión A Solaina
Picón, 3

Pension
Photo in Pensión A Solaina on the Camino de Santiago
12 Pensión Platas
Lugo, 26

Pension
13 Pensión 9 de Abril
Santiago, 7

Pension
Photo in Pensión 9 de Abril on the Camino de Santiago
14 Pensión En Ruta SCQ
Santiago, 23

Pension
Photo in Pensión En Ruta SCQ on the Camino de Santiago
15 Pensión Arca
Mollados, 25

Pension
16 Pensión Compás
Lugo, 47

Pension
17 Albergue O Trisquel
Picón, 1

Private
68 10
18 Pensión Codesal
Codesal, 17

Pension
19 Pensión Maruja
Nova, 9

Pension
20 Pensión O Muiño
Muiño, 1

Pension
21 Bule Bic
Lugo, 18

Pension
22 Pensión Casal de Calma
Igrexa, 10

Pension
23 LO Pedrouzo
Mollados, 43

Pension

Amenal

Distance to Santiago: 
16.40
4.00km
Altitude: 
250

Amenal is little more than a camino pit-stop, and the large outdoor patio of the only bar is often filled to capacity with pilgrims doing their best to make the last day last.

Notice: 

The camino crosses the very busy N-547 by passing underneath it. Do not cross over the road.

The Road: 

Leaving the bar behind you climb steeply uphill a short distance. The path soon levels out on a comfortable trail surrounded by eucalyptus trees. The Santiago Airport is very near, and the camino follows a path around the runway.

Name booking.com
1 Hotel Amenal
Amenal, 12

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Amenal on the Camino de Santiago

San Paio - San Payo

Distance to Santiago: 
12.40
2.10km
Altitude: 
334
History: 

The written history of San Paio has been lost to the ages, but the church here is dedicated to San Paio (or Payo), the 14 year old saint who was kidnapped by the invading Muslim troops, taken to Sevilla, and ultimately martyred to pieces and tossed into the Guadalquivir.

Lavacolla

Distance to Santiago: 
10.30
1.30km
Altitude: 
293
The Road: 

If you walked down the stairs to visit either of the bars at the bottom, turn and walk up the steps towards the Iglesia de Benaval. The camino continues around to the right-hand side and down to cross the road. At the road, cross at the crosswalk and continue along the road and over the famous river (see inset below).

The last hill is ahead, and if you are a stickler for doing things according to tradition you should start running now. It is said that the first of your group to arrive in Monte de Gozo is entitled to be called King. Be advised that there is no prize.

History: 

The name Lavacolla has one of the most debated origins of all the camino towns. They range from the bland “field at the bottom of the hill” to the more profane “scrub your scrotum.” What is more widely accepted is that pilgrims bathed in this river before entering the Cathedral.

Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Hotel Ruta Jacobea
Lavacolla, 41

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Ruta Jacobea on the Camino de Santiago
2 Hotel Garcas
Naval, 2

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Garcas on the Camino de Santiago
3 Hostal San Paio
Lavacolla

Hostal
4 Pazo Xan Xordo
Xan Xordo, 6

Casa Rural
Photo in Pazo Xan Xordo on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue Lavacolla
Lavacolla, 35

Private
32 12

Monte del Gozo

Distance to Santiago: 
5.00
5.00km
Altitude: 
338

Monte de Gozo, or Mount Joy, was once the first place that pilgrims could get a glimpse of the Cathedral spires. A new stand of trees blocks the view now. It is a large gathering place for pilgrims, who flock to the over-sized monument commemorating the pilgrimage that Pope John Paul II made here in 1993. The modest Capilla de San Marcos has the last stamp and a small kiosk selling cold drinks.

The Road: 

You do not need to enter the complex but for the sake of curiosity, carrying on down the road will take you where you are heading.

Pass the outdoor gallery of a local (and gifted) sculptor of stone and cross the bridge over the highway. It is midway over this bridge that you enter the city of Santiago de Compostela but to keep pilgrims from crossing the road half way across the bridge, the sign indicating such has been moved further into the city.

Photo in Monte del Gozo on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price
1 Albergue de Monte do Gozo
Estrellas, 80

Xunta
400 6

Barrio San Lázaro

The Road: 

The walk into Santiago is through the urbanized zone that has grown up around the old town. After passing over the highway bridge the first part of Santiago you walk through is the Barrio San Lazaro; the church here is said to be the limit for pilgrims with leprosy. There is a fairly large intersection to cross where the arrows disappear and are replaced by blue and yellow signs on posts. At last, you will enter the old town, through the Porta do Camiño, winding gently through the stone paved lanes, through the Plaza Cervantes, under the Bishops residence, and into the Plaza de Obradoiro. Congratulations, and welcome to Santiago de Compostela!

History: 

This outermost barrio of Santiago was once the closest point that pilgrims affected with leprosy were permitted to go. See last page for accommodation here.

Santiago de Compostela

1.40km
Altitude: 
250

There is a tremendous amount of things to see and things to do in Santiago de Compostela; you are encouraged to stay for at least one full day extra for exploring the web of streets, all of which seem to bring you back to the Cathedral.

The pilgrim’s office and two tourist information offices (one for Santiago, one for Galicia) are located on the Rúa do Vilar. They can provide you will all of the information and maps you could need.

One word of caution regarding accommodation is in order. If you are arriving in the high season, you are advised to make a reservation in advance. There have been several additions to the albergue roster in recent year but the numbers of pilgrims still exceed capacity in the high season.

The Cathedral is the single largest attraction to Santiago and for good reason. Both inside and out it presents countless treasures to investigate, too many to list in fact but below are the best

The Cathedral - Plaza by plaza
1. Azabache: As you enter the city, the first part of the Cathedral that you pass is the Puerta de la Azabachería. This is the entrance that faces the Monastery of San Martin Piñario.

2: Obradoiro: From Azabache you pass under the Palace of the Bishop which is adjoined to the Cathedral and cannot possibly be the sort of palace that affords much peaceful sleeping; the sound of bagpipes welcoming you can be heard from dawn to dusk. The stairway leads directly to the Plaza de Obradoiro and kilometer zero for pilgrims. In the center of the plaza is the last scallop shell and you are likely to find pilgrims taking their shoes off for a photo with it, and the Obradoiro Facade behind them.

This facade is the most majestic and most photographed of the Cathedral and was part of the 18th century building projects that took place in Santiago. The baroque design will keep your eyes moving and the massive amounts of glass allow for the illumination of the Pórtico de la Gloria that lies behind it. That Pórtico was the original front to the church designed by Maestro Mateo 600 years before the new facade.

If you continue around the Cathedral you arrive at the Puerta de las Platerías (named for the silver craft that still exists in the shops below it). You will notice that some of the stonework stands out as a different material. These are replacement carvings, the originals were damaged and subsequently moved to the Cathedral Museum; and unfortunately for us the original composition was forgotten, leaving a somewhat nonsensical layout. In front of the doors are a set of stairs and the Platerías fountain.

Continuing around the Cathedral we arrive in the large Plaza de Quintana and the Puerta de Perdon. The actual Holy Door is behind this facade (which is not actually a structural part of the Cathedral, it is more like a highly decorated wall around the Holy Door itself). The carvings here are impressive and depict 24 Saints and prophets.

In medieval times it was common for pilgrims to spend the night in the Cathedral, sleeping on the stone floors and fighting (to the death on a few occasions) for the privilege of sleeping close to their chapel of choice.

The best time to visit is early in the morning before the crowds arrive, when paying a visit to the crypt and hugging the bust of Santiago can be done quietly and with a bit of contemplation.

The botafumeiro, quite possibly the largest thurible in the Catholic Church, is swung across the transept (from north to south) by a group of men called the tiraboleiros. It has only come loose from the ropes twice, and never in modern times. The 2017 schedule was unclear at the time this book was printed, ask at the pigrims office for more information.

The Monastery and Museum of San Martin Piñario
The enormity of this Monastery is difficult to comprehend, but if you pay close attention to this building as you walk around Santiago you will find that you are almost always standing next to it if you are on the north side of the Cathedral. There are three cloisters! The facade of the church often feels like it is somewhere else entirely and is quite curious for the fact that you must descend the staircase to get to the doors, rather than the other way around. The reason for this was a decree by the Archbishop that no building should exceed in elevation that of the Cathedral; the architects did not compromise by redesigning San Martin to be less tall, they simply dug down and started at a lower point.

San Fiz de Solovio
Compared to the two churches above, San Fiz feels like an almost minuscule affair. To find it, make your way to the Santiago Market. San Pelayo (the hermit that rediscovered the bones of Santiago) was praying here when the lights called him. Grand and majestic it is not, but the oldest building site in Santiago it certainly is. The church that exists today is not the original, but excavations have revealed the foundations and necropolis dating to the 6th century.

The Supply Market (Mercado de Abastos)
The produce market is a great place to wander for lunch. Compared to other markets in Spain (like those in Madrid and Barcelona) the Santiago market is a fairly solemn affair. In fact, the architecture appears almost strictly utilitarian and is as Galician as it gets. The vendors make the experience, and even if your Spanish is not up to par, it is worth the visit for a glimpse into the way the locals go about their most ordinary business.

The buildings you see today date from the early 1940’s but replace ones that stood for 300 years. In fact, many of the vendors are second, third, or fifth generation market operators.

Alameda Park
Alameda Park was once the sort of place where the people of Santiago would turn out for elaborate displays of personal wealth and stature; the various paths that cut through and around the park were only to be used by members of a certain class. Nowadays it is far more democratic. The park is the site of a Ferris wheel and feria during the Summer months, an ice skating rink during the Winter holidays, and a massive eucalyptus tree overlooking the Cathedral year round.

Casa De La Troya
The Troya House is the inspiration for and setting of one of the most celebrated novels in Spanish literature; in which a young man from Madrid if forced by his father to finish his Law studies in Santiago... a tale of misery and eventually love. It was once a boarding house for students and the museum that exists there today is an exhibit of what the house would have looked like at the time the novel was written. The Tuna, those wonderful musicians that perform in the Plaza Obradoiro every night, would have lived and performed here as well.

The Hidden Pilgrim

Hiding in the shadows cast by the Cathedral, in the Plaza Quintana, is the hidden pilgrim. He is only visible at night and might take a while to discover.

And lastly, there are many Monasteries, and while it would be a challenge to visit all of them it is important to realize their construction shaped the city that we see today. Taking the time to walk between them will reveal countless little treasures.

Fiesta: 

The Feast day of Saint James is celebrated with a full week of music and dance, with a fireworks display in the Plaza Obradoiro on the evening of the 24th of July. The best views can be had from Obradoiro, or from Alameda park.

Photo in Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
Name Beds Price booking.com
1 Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela
Estocolmo, 2

Private
60 10/12 Photo in Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Acuario de Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
2 Residencia de Peregrinos San Lázaro
San Lázaro

Xunta
80 10
3 Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela
Quiroga Palacios

Private
199 10/12 Photo in Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Seminario Menor en Santiago de Compostela on the Camino de Santiago
4 Albergue O Fogar de Teodomiro
Algalia de Arriba, 3

Private
20 15 Photo in Albergue O Fogar de Teodomiro on the Camino de Santiago
5 Albergue de peregrinos Jaime García Rodríguez
Estocolmo

Association
150 8
6 Albergue Mundoalbergue
San Clemente, 26

Private
30 12/18 Photo in Albergue Mundoalbergue on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Mundoalbergue on the Camino de Santiago
7 Albergue Santo Santiago
Valiño, 3

Private
40 10
8 Albergue Turístico La Salle
Tras Santa Clara

Private
84 17
9 Albergue Fin del Camino
Moscova

Parochial
110 8* Photo in Albergue Fin del Camino on the Camino de Santiago
10 Albergue The Last Stamp
Preguntoiro, 10

Private
62 15/25 Photo in Albergue The Last Stamp on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue The Last Stamp on the Camino de Santiago
11 Albergue Azabache
Azabachería, 15

Private
22 14/18 Photo in Albergue Azabache on the Camino de Santiago
12 Albergue Meiga Backpackers
Basquiños, 67

Private
30 11/13*
13 Albergue Roots & Boots
Cruceiro do Gaio, 7

Private
48 12/18 Photo in Albergue Roots & Boots on the Camino de Santiago
14 Albergue La Estrella de Santiago
Concheiros, 36-38

Private
24 10
15 Albergue Porta Real
dos Concheiros, 10

Private
24 10/15 Photo in Albergue Porta Real on the Camino de SantiagoPhoto in Albergue Porta Real on the Camino de Santiago
16 Albergue La Estación
Xoana Nogueira, 14

Private
24 12
17 Hostal Reis Católicos (Parador de Santiago)
Obradoiro, 1

Parador
Photo in Hostal Reis Católicos (Parador de Santiago) on the Camino de Santiago
18 Hospedería San Martín Pinario
Pl. de la Inmaculada, 3

Hotel
Photo in Hospedería San Martín Pinario on the Camino de Santiago
19 Hotel Nest Style Santiago
Doutor Teixeiro, 15

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Nest Style Santiago on the Camino de Santiago
20 Hotel Avenida
Fuente de San Antonio, 5

Hotel
Photo in Hotel Avenida on the Camino de Santiago
21 Hostal Alameda
San Clemente, 32

Hostal
Photo in Hostal Alameda on the Camino de Santiago
22 Hostal Mapoula
Entremurallas, 10-3

Hostal
Photo in Hostal Mapoula on the Camino de Santiago
23 Pensión Pazo de Argra
Calderería, 37

Pension
24 Albergue Monterrey
Fontiñas, 65a

Private
36 10/12
25 Albergue La Credencial
Fonte dos Concheiros, 13

Private
36 10/14
26 Albergue Compostela
Pedro de Mezonzo, 28

Private
27 Albergue Basquinos 45
Pedro de Mezonzo, 28

Private
28 Albergue Linares
Algalia de Abaixo, 34

Private
29 Blanco Albergue
Galeras, 30

Private
20 12